Patient Forms

Forms can be completed online through the patient portal or you can print them from our website and bring them with you to your appointment.

Useful Links

Useful Links

Further information can be found on the following web sites. Always remember that all information may be subject to some bias; please ask us if you have any queries.

  • American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
  • www.acog.com

    This official website of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists provides a physician directory, health columns, post-graduate courses and much more.
  • American Heart Association
  • www.women.americanheart.org

    The American Heart Association Women’s website gives women of all ages the facts on women’s heart disease and stroke.
  • American Medical Association
  • www.ama-assn.org

    The official website of the American Medical Association.
  • American Psychological Association
  • www.apa.org

    The official website of the American Psychological Association.
  • Mayo Clinic Health Oasis
  • www.mayohealth.org

    This online information source has an extensive women’s health section.
  • 
National Alliance of Breast Cancer Organizations
  • www.nabco.org
  • National Library of Medicine
  • www.nlm.nih.gov

    The National Library of Medicine website provides diverse health information.
  • National Osteoporosis Foundation
  • www.nof.org
    The National Osteoporosis Foundation is a leading resource for up-to-date, medically sound information on the causes, prevention, detection and treatment of osteoporosis.
  • National Ovarian Cancer Coalition
  • www.ovarian.org
    The National Ovarian Cancer Coalition seeks to raise awareness and promote education about ovarian cancer.
  • The New York Times Women’s Health
  • www.nytimes.com/health
    Extensive women’s health information is offered, including statistics, a searchable database of information on women’s topics, and an online bookstore.
  • The North American Menopause Society
  • www.menopause.org/
    The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) is a nonprofit organization that provides a forum for a multitude of scientific disciplines with an interest in the human female menopause.
  • OnHealth
  • www.onhealth.com

    In-depth medical information, health tips, a free e-mail newsletter and access to the powerful Health Tracker.
  • Online resources for diabetes
  • www.mendosa.com/faq.htm
    This Web page provides a large collection of links to diabetic resources.
  • Prevention Magazine’s Healthy Ideas
  • www.healthyideas.com
    Health-related information from the publishers of Prevention magazine.

Additional Useful Tools

Your Custom Hereditary Cancer Quiz

Hereditary Cancer Quiz Implementation Guide

Your Custom Family History Tool


External Content Disclaimer

*Please note that pages of this site may be linked to other websites, which may have different terms of use and privacy practices than Privia Medical Group. Privia does not own, control, manage, supervise, direct, or otherwise have involvement in such other websites or the content of such websites. Privia is not responsible for the content of any linked websites. Privia is not acting as an agent for these websites, nor does Privia endorse or guarantee, in any way, their websites, content, or products. Privia makes no representation or warranty regarding the accuracy of information contained in linked websites, takes no responsibility for the use of copyrighted or otherwise protected materials on such linked websites, and has no control over the privacy practices or use of user information at such linked websites.

Preparing for Surgery

Preparing for Surgery

Once you and your surgeon decide that surgery will help you, you’ll need to learn what preparing mentally and physically for surgery entails. Understanding the process and your role in it will help you recover more quickly and have fewer problems.

Working with Your Doctor

Before surgery, your surgeon will give you a complete physical examination to make sure you don’t have any conditions that could interfere with the surgery or its outcome. Routine tests, such as blood tests and X-rays, are usually performed a week before the surgery.

Discuss any medications you are taking with your doctor and your family physician to see which ones you should stop taking before surgery.

Discuss with your doctor options for preparing for potential blood replacement, including donating your own blood, medical interventions, and other treatments, prior to surgery.

If you are overweight, losing weight is advisable. However, you should not diet during the month before your surgery.

If you are taking aspirin or anti-inflammatory medications, you will need to stop taking them one week before surgery to minimize bleeding.

If you smoke, you should stop or cut down to reduce your surgery risks and improve your recovery.

Have any tooth, gum, bladder or bowel problems treated before surgery to reduce the risk of infection later.

Eat a well-balanced diet, supplemented by a daily multivitamin with iron.

Report any infections to your doctor. Surgery cannot be performed until all infections have cleared up.

Home Planning

Arrange for someone to help out with everyday tasks like cooking, shopping, and laundry.

Put items that you use often within easy reach before surgery so you won’t have to reach and bend as often.

Remove all loose carpets and tape down electrical cords to avoid falls.

Make sure you have a stable chair with a firm seat cushion, a firm back, and two arms.

Preparing for Procedure

If you are having Day Surgery, remember the following:

Have someone available to take you home, you will not be able to drive for at least 24 hours.

Do not drink or eat anything in the car on the trip home.

The combination of anesthesia, food, and car motion can quite often cause nausea or vomiting. After arriving home, wait until you are hungry before trying to eat. Begin with a light meal and try to avoid greasy food for the first 24 hours.

Take your pain medicine as directed. Begin the pain medicine as you start getting uncomfortable, but before you are in severe pain. If you wait to take your pain medication until the pain is severe, you will have more difficulty controlling the pain.